Resources Help File


March of Time

Alternate Title:
The March of Time

To link to this resource use:
http://www.libraries.iub.edu/scripts/countResources.php?resourceId=33305721


Database available to authorized IU Bloomington users (on or off campus) Database available to authorized IU Bloomington users (on or off campus)
Vendor:
Alexander Street Press
Producer:
Alexander Street Press
Coverage:
1935-1967


From 1935-1967, American theatergoers and television watchers were witness to Time Inc.'s unique and controversial film series, The March of Time. This series is now available in online streaming video in a single, cross-searchable collection designed specifically to meet the needs of researchers, teaching faculty, and students.(OCLC)
"For the better part of two decades movie audiences were informed and entertained by The March of Time, monthly installments of propaganda-flavored “newsreels” that combined actuality footage with reenactments. The March of Time expressed the worldview of Time magazine creator Henry Luce, who candidly described the series as “fakery in allegiance to the truth.” Relying on the omniscient narration of Westbrook Van Voorhis, the series had an enormous impact; it won an Oscar in 1937 and was satirized by Orson Welles in Citizen Kane. Even the MoMA Film Library was deemed a worthy subject for examination in a 1939 newsreel. As historian Raymond Fielding described it, “Time editorialized openly, infuriating its enemies and oftentimes alienating its friends. And it did all this with vigor, artistry, and showmanship.” This sampling of “Time capsules” from a distant but eerily similar era reminds us that “time [still] marches on!” All films were produced in the U.S." Museum of Modern Art. The March of Time, Seventy-fifth Anniversary September 1–10, 2010.

Number of Users:
unlimited
Interlibrary Loan:
Not Permitted
Resource Advocate:
Savonius-Wroth, Celestina
SFX Source:
No
Federated Search:
No

IUB Library Subjects:
  • American Studies
  • History

Library of Congress Subjects:

History, Modern -- 20th century.
Documentary films.
Newsreels.
Nonfiction films.
Electronic reference sources.
United States -- History -- Motion pictures.