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last updated: 4/24/2012

Collection Development Policies - Philosophy

Philosophy

  1. Introduction
    1. Purpose of the policy statement
      This policy is intended as a guideline for purchases on the Philosophy budget.

    2. Audience
      The intended audience is comprised of Libraries staff and administrators, faculty and students at Indiana University, and colleagues at other research libraries with comparable collections.

    3. Description of institution/department and clientele
      The collection serves the undergraduate and graduate teaching programs in philosophy as well as the students and scholars in the humanities who need materials in philosophy as background for their more specific studies. Through its curriculum, the Philosophy Department (http://www.indiana.edu/~phil/) offers students the opportunity to examine the problems which have appeared in the Western philosophical tradition through the study of the writings of the great philosophical thinkers. Courses are offered in the history of philosophy, metaphysics, ethics, logic, epistemology, social and political philosophy. The program has 140 undergraduate majors and 50+ graduate students. The department courses enroll 1600 students total in the fall semester; in the spring, the department enrolls 1450 students.

    4. Brief overview of the collection
      1. Collection strengths and weaknesses and Subject areas emphasized or deemphasized
        Western philosophy is an area of strength. Eastern philosophy has not been a priority. Emphasis is on philosophy in Western Europe, Great Britain, and America. There is limited collecting in philosophy of Eastern Europe, the Orient, and Latin America. Although Eastern philosophy has been scarcely collected at all and then only in English, the Department offers courses in Eastern philosophy and the collection needs to grow in order to support those classes. Similarly, there is interest in philosophy and technology; this area needs to be explored and possible collaborative efforts with other collection managers need to be considered.
      2. Collection locations
        Philosophy collections are located on the 4th floor of the Wells Library, as well as in the Auxiliary Library Facility (ALF).
  2. Scope of Coverage
    1. Languages collected and excluded
      Languages collected include English, French, Latin, and limited Italian. Slavic and non-western languages are excluded, though these may be covered by the various area studies collections.
    2. Geographical areas covered and excluded
      Emphasis is on philosophy in Western Europe, Great Britain, and America. There is limited collecting in philosophy of Eastern Europe, the Orient, and Latin America.

    3. Chronological periods covered and excluded
      There are no exclusions on a chronological basis.

    4. Dates of publication of materials collected; current vs. retrospective coverage
      Collecting is predominantly current, with retrospective collecting to fill in gaps.

    5. Formats collected and excluded
      Formats collected include books, periodicals, electronic resources, and microforms. Films and tapes are excluded.
  3. Collecting Responsibility
    The Librarian for Philosophy is responsible for selection and collection management in Philosophy. There is collaboration with librarians for Classical Studies, Religious Studies, and the History and Philosophy of Science.

  4. Related Collections
    Classical Studies, Religious Studies, and the History and Philosophy of Science.

  5. Principal Sources of Supply and Major Selection Tools
    Approval plans, vendor catalogs, journal reviews, faculty requests.

  6. Preservation
    1. Criteria for selection for preservation and/or mass deacidification
      • Pre-1800 publications
      • Nineteenth-century publications
    2. High-priority areas of the collection for preservation review and treatment
      • Pre-1800 publications
      • Nineteenth-century publications
  7. Selection Criteria for ALF
    • Duplicate copies, low use, age, physical condition.
    • Journal runs that are duplicated in the libraries’ online subscriptions.
    • Faculty input.
  8. Digital Projects
    Projects current as of 2007 include Midwestern Identities, a collaborative project with other subject librarians. The project will digitize and create a context for 200 titles published in the U.S. that are characterized by attention to immigrant culture and assimilation in the Midwest. Some philosophy titles are included.

  9. Other Resources and Libraries
    Major University resources include the Media Center with its audiovisual materials, and the Lilly Library, with its special collections of rare books, manuscripts, papers, letters and notes contemporary Belles-lettres.

  10. Consortial Agreements
    None specific to Philosophy.
Revised April 2012


last updated: 4/24/2012